Archive for December, 2014

23
Dec

In Too Deep

Adrion poolYesterday I visited a podiatrist to address pain that I’d been experiencing in my foot since the summer. After 5 months of pain, I’d finally decided that I needed a professional opinion to confirm what I already knew. My foot was broken.

This all happened during a summer trip to my aunt’s backyard pool. My five-year old daughter had decided to test out her newfound swimming skills by playing swim instructor, and I was volun-told that I’d be the student. Obediently I watched as she first demonstrated each skill before commanding me to follow suit, one drill after another.

Plunging below the water’s surface, she popped up sputtering, Mommy, put your face in the water!

Her arms and legs splashing furiously, she ordered, Mommy, kick your legs!

Now, cannonball!

In she went. Splash!

Dutifully I lined up, happily poised in her fast-drying footprints.

Wait…what?!…Cannonball???

I glanced at the markings along the pool’s edge – No Diving  3’8”.

My not-so-common sense was loudly whispering – You know this might not be a good idea, right? Uh…maybe not. Yet, I closed my eyes and jumped anyway.

So many times in life, we make decisions in spite of the warning signs right before our eyes. If we’re lucky, we’re able to walk away from those choices with just a few emotional bumps and bruises, but sometimes we find ourselves hobbling away – broken – having to live with the pain of our decision.

If you’re anything like me, it might take you a while to even admit that there is a problem. You’ll ignore, hide, deny, and even make excuses for the pain. You’ll convince yourself that it doesn’t hurt that bad or you can live with it, trying to ignore that constant voice whispering inside. But, there’s a lesson even in our pain.

We all have made, are making, or will make mistakes in our lives. We’ll ignore the warning signs, jump, and sometimes come up broken. But, the healing begins when we admit that no one pushed us into the deep end or, in my case, the shallow end. It is a choice. I guess the lesson I learned in all of this was that I need to heed the signs that warn of dangers ahead as it could save me from a moment or a lifetime of pain and to listen to that voice inside when it cautions me to pause…slow down…don’t jump. Well, of course, that and to be smarter than a 5-year old.

 

09
Dec

The Missing Link

parkourLike many their age, my boys are completely amazed by the parkour action videos on YouTube. As defined by Wikipedia, parkour “is a holistic training discipline” in which a person runs, jumps, swings, or catapults their body using whatever obstacle within their reach to get from point A to B.

Sounds holistic, right?

Well, all of the YouFoolers around the world have turned this holistic training into something akin to stepping off rooftops and vaulting across moving cars. As such, my teenage sons are completely enthralled with parkour and thoroughly entertained by the inevitable broken limbs, missing teeth, and crushed family jewels that seem par for the course.

So, one day as they sat captivated in front of the computer monitor clicking from one disaster to the next – oohing and aahing, gasping and laughing – they stopped to ask me, “Mom, why do they do this stuff?” Without missing a beat, I grabbed a piece of paper and drew two large Xs on it.

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I asked, “Do you know what this is?”

As only boys would, they responded, “uhm…Xs.”

As if talking to my kindergartner, I slowly nodded. (Didn’t want to risk losing them on this one.)

“These XXs represent the female chromosome.”

Next, I scribbled across one of the Xs so that now there was what appeared to be an XY.

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“Now, what do you see?”

Blank stares.

I continued, “These are the XY chromosomes, representing the male species.”

Blank stares.

I then circled the spot where I’d scribbled on the X.

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“This is where intelligence is located. The missing link. This explains why men will step in front of a speeding vehicle – on purpose – for laughs.”

Hence, the male mind. Science made simple.

Next class, please.

02
Dec

Not Always the Best Policy

belly upFrom the day we arrive on the planet

And blinking, step into the sun

There’s more to be seen than can ever be seen

More to do than can ever be done

In the circle, the circle of life

Every time I watch the scene from the animated film The Lion King when Mufasa proudly holds his young cub Simba high in the air, I well up with tears. Something about the message being shared between a father and his son, coupled with the rhythmic beating of the drums, gets me in my get up every time.

I started thinking about this yesterday when chatting with a good friend about how to break the news to her 4-year old daughter that her beloved fish had died. My friend was debating on the honest approach – tell her the truth and take her to the pet store to buy another fish. A green one.

I, too, have always opted for the truth with my kids – with the occasional indulgence into fantasy (Tooth Fairy, Easter Bunny, Santa Claus) – so, I understood exactly where she was coming from. However, I learned a long time ago that the truth may not always be the best thing with young kids. At least that’s the lesson I learned years ago when trying to explain the circle of life to my then 5-year old son when his pet fish Oscar died.

Let me take you back to that tragic day.

Returning home from school one day, my son walked past me to greet his aqua buddy – only to find an empty fishbowl. You see, earlier that morn after taking my son to school, I returned home to find his pet fish Oscar – belly up. Sleeping with the fishes. For a moment, I panicked. I didn’t know how I would break the news to my son that his fish was dead.

Did he even really understand what “dead” meant?

He was after all only 5-years old, and it wasn’t like we’d ever sat down with him to explain birth or death. To be honest, the closest we’d probably ever gotten to talking about any of this was when trying to explain why mommy always started crying when Mufasa was pushed from the cliff and died. (Seriously, doesn’t that scene make your eyeballs tingle?) Anyway, suffice it to say that I was a bit nervous about how my son would react.

Well, at some point during the day, I began to irrationally rationalize that my son probably wouldn’t even be upset because most days he barely even paid attention to the fish and if he did get upset, then I could always refer back to a movie we’d seen at least a million times – The Lion King to explain a simple truth. Life begins and ends. Simple, right?

Wrong.

The kid had a straight up meltdown!

Once he’d scanned the fishbowl from every angle and realized there was no fish, he turned to me and said, “Mommy, where’s Oscar?”

I gently replied, “Oscar died, baby. He went to see Jesus.”

Wrong answer.

The boy dropped to his knees and sobbed “Osssssssssssssscaaaaaaaaaaaaaaar!”

O-M-G!

In an effort to console him, I immediately began babbling about how all pets go to heaven (at least dogs do) and how everything lives and dies. Wrong, wrong, wrong. The more I talked, the more he cried, and somewhere along the way I started verbally moonwalking. I began rambling on about how Jesus can perform miracles and miraculously Oscar was alive and at the pet hospital (a.k.a. the pet store). We just had to go pick him up.

He stopped crying. So, off we went to the pet store to retrieve “Oscar 2.0”

The moral of this story is: honesty will only get you but so far with a 5-year old.

I can’t wait to hear how my girlfriend says it went with her daughter.